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Friday, March 14, 2014

Improving English Pronunciation Short Vowels Videos




You can improve your English pronunciation with practice, as they say practice makes perfect. These videos from BBC Learn English can help you work on areas of your pronunciation that you may have difficulty with.

Short Vowel A sound as in "cat"
Short Vowel E sound as in "met"
Short Vowel I sound as in "fit"
Short Vowel O sound as in "lot"

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Time Clauses with before, after, and when




·        A time clause explains when something happened. It begins with one of the following before, after, and when. 
·        Use a comma after the time clause.
·        We can also use these time clauses after the main clause.
·        If it comes after the main clause it doesn’t need a comma.

Before she ate, she washed her hands.
She washed her hands before she ate.

After she used the toilet, she washed her hands.
She washed her hands after she used the toilet.

When she was washing her hands, she dropped the soap.
She dropped the soap when she was washing her hands.


Here is a video on time clauses, although it focuses on the future it explains the time clauses well.

Similarity and agreement with so, too, either, neither




When we agree with something someone says:
Positive Answers Verb To Be:

Negative Answers
I am tired

I am not going to the party.
So am I

Neither am I / Neither are we
I am, too/ She is too.

I'm not either / We are not either
Me, too (casual)

Me, neither (casual)



Difference between either and neither:
Neither Sara nor Marina is going to the party. (The girls are not going to the party)

Either Sara or Marina is going to the party. (One of them will go to the party)



Agreement with other verbs:
Positive

Negative
Carolina runs fast.

Nuria doesn’t run fast.
So do I / So does he.

Neither do I.
I do, too. / Me, too. (casual)

I don’t, either.


Me, neither (casual)


agreeing: so, too, neither, either


More PowerPoint presentations from Beth Bogage

Monday, March 3, 2014

Adverbs of Manner



Adverbs of manner tell how something is done
  • Often come after a verb
    • He talked quietly.
  • Sometimes is placed before the verb to add emphasis
    • He quietly walked out the door.
  • Usually end in -ly
    • Exemptions: 
      • hard, fast, so, well
  • To know when to use an adverb of manner versus an adjective ask yourself:
    • Is it describing how someone is?
      • She is nice.
      • They were calm after the earthquake.
    • Is it describing how something was done?
      • She behaves nicely.
      • The reacted calmly to the earthquake.
The following table has some common adverbs of manner. The ones that are together can have close meaning. The ones on the Positive/Negative column can be used either in a positive or negative form.





Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Storytelling Vocabulary



be based on
(N) a story that was inspired by events that actually occurred
be hooked on
(V) to be addicted to something
brave
(ADJ) willing to do things that are dangerous, and does not show fear in difficult or dangerous situations
character
(N) who a book, movie, or play is about
clever
(ADJ) someone who is intelligent and able to understand things easily or plan things well
eventually
(ADV) in the end, especially after a lot of delays, problems, or arguments
follow
(V) to keep up with the news of a particular person or group
happy ending
(N) a positive conclusion to something
incredible
(ADJ) something that is very unusual or surprising, and you cannot believe it is really true, although it may be
make up
(V) to invent a situation and describe it to others for entertainment
overcome
(V) when you successfully deal with a problem and control it
predictable
(ADJ) it is obvious in advance that it will happen
realistic
(ADJ) recognize and accept something's true nature and try to deal with it in a practical way
soap opera
(N) a television drama series about the lives and problems of a group of people
struggle
(V) try hard
survive
(V) manage to live or continue in spite of difficulties
tell a story
(V) to entertain or inform others by describing true or fictitious events
the same old story
(PHRASE) a phrase describing something that happens very often
true story
(N) events that actually occurred
TV series
(N) a set of programs of a particular kind which have the same title
uneducated
(ADJ) does not have a high standard of learning

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Celebrations Vocabulary



Vocabulary




be held(V) to take place
contest(N) a competition or game that people try to win
first prize(N) a reward for winning a contest
race(N) a competition to see who is the fastest
root for(V) to cheer for someone or something
win(V) do better than everyone else
celebrate(V) when you do something enjoyable because of a special occasion
celebrationa joyful occasion for special festivities to mark some happy event
full(ADJ) have plenty of something, so you don?t want any more
gather(V) come together in a group
get together(V) meet as a small group
have a good time(V) to enjoy yourself
host(N) the person who has invited the guests and provides the food, drink, or entertainment at a party
host a party(V) invite guests and provide the food, drink, or entertainment
housewarminga party of people assembled to celebrate moving into a new home
invite(V) ask someone to come to a party or event
participate(N) take part in
perform(V) to play music, dance, or act in front of an audience
performeran entertainer who performs a dramatic or musical work for an audience
plan a party(V) decide in detail what you are going to do for a party before it happens
rowdypeople who are noisy, rough, and out of control
throw a partyorganize a party
nightcluba spot that is open at night that provides entertainment such as dancing, food and drink
wild(ADJ) wild behavior is uncontrolled, excited, or energetic


neitheradj.
Not one or the other; not either: Neither shoe feels comfortable.
pron.
Not either one; not the one or the other: Neither of the twins is here. Neither will do. Neither of them is incorrect.
Neither we nor they want it. She neither called nor wrote. I got neither the gift nor the card.
2. Also not: If he won't go, neither will she.
adv.
Similarly not; also not: Just as you would not, so neither would they.
eitherThe one or the other: Which movie do you want to see? Either will be fine.
conj.
Used before the first of two or more coordinates or clauses linked by or: Either we go now or we remain here forever.
adj.
1. Any one of two; one or the other: Wear either coat.
2. One and the other; each: rings on either hand.
adv.
Likewise; also. Used as an intensive following negative statements: If you don't order a dessert, I won't either.

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Giving Advice with Could, Should, Ought to, and Had Better



  • Should and Ought can be used interchangeably, they have a close meaning.
  • You might hear some people use "You better" instead of "You had better."
    • Use "You had better" it is the correct form.
  • Ought to and had better are not used in questions


 
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